Discussion:
Mexico community that lost three mothers and six children in cartel massacre was founded by U.S. citizens fleeing a polygamy ban...
(too old to reply)
Miloch
2019-11-06 05:13:47 UTC
Permalink
...and has been blighted by drug violence, murder and abuse for decades

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7653577/Life-inside-LeBaron-Mormon-stronghold-Mexico-blighted-cartel-violence-murder.html

*Nine members of the LeBaron family were killed by cartel gunmen on Monday

•Their deaths sent shockwaves around the world and even led to President Donald
Trump offering to help Mexico 'wage war' on the drug cartels

•But it would not be the first time the break-away church has been attacked

•In fact the extended community has already faced cartel violence and killings

•It has also been plagued by murders between their own family members

•As recently as 2010, two members of the Chihuahua Mormon community, including
one from the LeBaron family, were killed in an apparent revenge attack

•And in 2016 one former resident detailed a harsh life inside the community

•LeBaron was founded as an offshoot of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints after the church abandoned the practice of polygamy in the 1800s


The slaughter of three mothers and six of their children has drawn attention to
life inside LeBaron, the Mormon stronghold in Mexico founded by U.S. citizens
fleeing a polygamy ban and blighted by years of cartel violence and murder.

All nine of those killed after they were attacked eight miles apart while
traveling in a convoy of three SUVS on a dirt road were extended members of the
remote community.

Their deaths sent shockwaves around the world and even led to President Donald
Trump offering to help Mexico 'wage war' on the drug cartels and 'wipe them off
the face of the earth'.

But it would not be the first time that members of the break-away church had
been attacked in northern Mexico.

In fact the extended community has already faced cartel violence and killings,
as well as murders between their own family members.

As recently as 2010, two members of the Chihuahua Mormon community, including
one from the LeBaron family, were killed in apparent revenge after security
forces tracked drug gang members.

The Mormons had suffered widespread kidnappings before that. Their large houses
and lifestyle had made them appear rich to drug gangs, Vice reported in 2012.

And in 2016 former resident Ruth Wariner detailed life inside the community,
describing 41 siblings, constant beatings, a house with no electricity and no
modern plumbing.

Founded as part of an offshoot of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints after the church abandoned the practice of polygamy in the late 1800s,
some polygamous Mormons moved to Mexico to set up new colonies.

The LeBaron family, based in the Mexican border state of Sonora, was founded by
Alma Dayer LeBaron. He set up the community with his family in 1924 after being
excommunicated from the church.

Alma passed the leadership over to his son Joel when he died in 1951. He
subsequently incorporated the community as part of Salt Lake City' Church of the
Firstborn.

His younger brother Ervil was his second in charge at the time. The brothers
later fell out over the leadership of the community and Ervil went on to set up
another sect in San Diego, California in 1972.

Evril, who had at least 13 wives, had Joel killed in 1972. He was tried and
convicted in Mexico for Joel's murder in 1974.

While in prison, he wrote the 400-page commandment to kill disobedient church
members who were included in a hit list.

Evril died in prison in 1981 but six family members organized 'four o'clock'
murders, which saw an eight-year-old child and three former members shot dead
within minutes of each other in Texas in 1988.

His son Heber was held in connection with slayings in Texas and Utah in the
1980s. Another sons, Aaron, was jailed for 45 years in a conviction connected to
the murders.

One of Evril's daughter Anna LeBaron said: 'My father would order mob-style hits
and those would be carried out by his cult members if they stopped believing in
him or his practice or religion and left, or sometimes it was rival cult leaders
that were blood-atoned for being false prophets.'

While many La Mora residents, where the victims lived, identify as Mormon, they
also consider themselves independent from The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-day Saints, said Cristina Rosetti, a Mormon fundamentalism scholar and
expert.

Many of the families living in the area known for growing cotton and grain trace
their La Mora origins to the 1950s - and some have much deeper roots.

A La Mora resident who spoke on condition of anonymity said his great
grandfather settled there in the late 1890s or early 1900s after leaving the
U.S. and was later run back across the border by Mexican revolutionary Pancho
Villa.

The great grandfather didn't return, but the resident's grandfather moved back
to La Mora in the 1950s along with others, said the resident, who feared that he
could be targeted by the cartel if he was identified.

Although many La Mora residents believe in mainstream Mormonism tenets, they
also believe 'they shouldn't be forming churches, they shouldn't be organizing
under one leader. They should just be Mormon and live their Mormon life. That's
who the people of La Mora are,' Rosetti said.

Some of the families living there still practice polygamy while others stopped
generations ago, she said.

Ruth Wariner lived on Colonia LeBaron until she ran away at the age of 15 - and
took her three younger siblings with her. Her father was murdered when she was
three-years-old and her mother was quickly married off to another man in the
community.

That's when the beatings began, she says. And, eventually, repeated sexual
abuse.

Wariner said the church taught the women to turn a blind eye, believing marriage
was their only ticket into 'the kingdom of heaven'.

Many Mormons in Mexico enjoy dual Mexican and American citizenship.

Mexico has registered more than 250,000 murders since the government
controversially deployed the army to fight drug trafficking in 2006.

Ervil LeBaron who had at least 13 wives, had his brother Joel killed in 1972. He
was tried and convicted in Mexico for Joel's murder two years later

Many experts blame the 'drug war' for spiraling violence, as fragmented cartels
battle each other and the army.

Mexican Security Minister Alfonso Durazo said the nine, traveling in several
SUVs, may have been victims of mistaken identity, given the high number of
violent confrontations among warring drug gangs in the area.

But the LeBaron extended family has often been in conflict with drug traffickers
in Chihuahua and a relative of the victims said the killers surely knew who they
were targeting.

'We've been here for more than 50 years. There's no-one who doesn't know them.
Whoever did this was aware. That's the most terrifying,' said Alex LeBaron, a
relative, in one of the villages inhabited by the extended family.

Eric Hawkins, spokesman for the Utah-based Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day
Saints, said it understood the victims were not members of the institution, but
that the church was 'heartbroken' over the attack.

'Our love, prayers and sympathies are with them as they mourn and remember their
loved ones,' Hawkins said in a statement.




*
Miloch
2019-11-06 20:15:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
...and has been blighted by drug violence, murder and abuse for decades
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7653577/Life-inside-LeBaron-Mormon-stronghold-Mexico-blighted-cartel-violence-murder.html
Their deaths sent shockwaves around the world and even led to President Donald
Trump offering to help Mexico 'wage war' on the drug cartels and 'wipe them off
the face of the earth'.
Will the "war on cartels" be as successful as the current "war on
terrorism"?
or the "war on poverty"?
Does this mean the CIA will stop selling drugs as a way of raising money?
Will the U.S. arms dealers sell weapons to both sides like they often do?
Only the all-knowing...all-seeing Trumperoonie knows for sure





*

Loading...