Discussion:
Twas The Night Before Impeachment
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super70s
2019-12-17 18:40:07 UTC
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Twas the night before impeachment,
And all through the House
Not a creature was stirring,
Not even Rudy Ghouliani trying to dig up some dirt on the Bidens
Miloch
2019-12-17 19:04:48 UTC
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In article <***@reader.eternal-september.org>,
super70s says...
Post by super70s
Twas the night before impeachment,
And all through the House
Not a creature was stirring,
Not even Rudy Ghouliani trying to dig up some dirt on the Bidens
Trump could be indicted with fraud and bribery AFTER he leaves office, Democrats
warn at today's final impeachment hearing to set the rules for full House vote
on Wednesday

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-7802153/Trump-indicted-leaves-office-Democrats-warn.html

Rep. Jamie Raskin called nonsense on Republicans who are arguing that the
articles of impeachment are invalid because they don't include any real 'crimes'

He said it was like saying 'heads I win, tails you lose'

Raskin is leading the Democrats' testimony before the House Rules panel

The Rules Committee decides what debate on the House floor looks like

The House is expected to hold a vote on impeachment articles Wednesday

Rep. Jamie Raskin called nonsense on Republicans who are arguing that the
articles of impeachment against President Trump are invalid because they don't
include any real 'crimes.'

Raskin, testifying for the Democrats at Tuesday's House Rules Committee
impeachment meeting, said a lot of the conduct listed in the two articles of
impeachment 'could become part of criminal indictments later on.'

The Maryland Democrat reminded the room that Republicans were the first to argue
that a sitting president can't be indicted.

'They then cannot turn around and say "oh and you cannot impeach him because you
haven't charged him with any crimes and prosecuted him and indicted him,"'
Raskin argued.

The Democrat said it was like saying 'heads I win, tails you lose.'

'We didn't have to see that Richard Nixon had been convicted of burglary in the
District of Columbia ... before he was charged with abuse of power,' Raskin
said.

Raskin's dangling of indictments was a noteworthy moment in hearing that will
mostly consist of wonk.

The Rules Committee decides what debate on the House floor looks like.

Tuesday's hearing will be the last, long, and contentious public hearing on
impeachment before it moves to the House floor for a full vote among all
lawmakers in the lower chamber.

The House Rules Committee - consisting of nine Democrats and four Republicans -
began shortly after 11 AM EST.

House Rules Committee Chairman Jim McGovern, a Massachusetts Democrat, kicked
things off by daring his Republican colleagues to admit that Trump did something
wrong.

'What shocks me, quite frankly, about so many of my Republican friends, is their
inability to acknowledge that President Trump acted improperly,' McGovern said.
'It seems the only Republican members willing to admit the president did
something wrong have either already retired or announced plans they intend to
retire at the end of this Congress.'

McGovern said he understood that it was difficult to criticize a president of
one's own party. 'But that shouldn't matter here,' he argued.

'I admired President Clinton when he was president of the United States and
still do today. But when this House impeached him, which I didn't agree with, I
went to the House floor and I said I thought what President Clinton did was
wrong,' McGovern said.

The committee's ranking member, Rep. Tom Cole, a Republican from Oklahoma,
countered McGovern by asking why the Democrats were putting the country through
these proceedings when they knew it didn't have support - from both parties of
Congress, from both houses of Congress and from the American people.

'We already know that the votes to convict and remove the president from office
simply aren't there,' Cole said. 'Bluntly put, this is a matter that Congress,
as a whole, can't resolve on its own.'

The fiercely partisan panel wields much power.

It will determine how long lawmakers on the House floor will debate the two
articles of impeachment against the president and how many amendments can be
offered during the process.

Tuesday's hearing could last well into the night if Republicans on the panel
offer multiple amendments to the process - all of which will be expected to fail
given the Democratic majority.

Still it gives lawmakers on both sides of the aisle one last to put on a show
for the television cameras as the impeachment process wraps up its journey in
the House and prepares to move across the Capitol into the Senate.

The hearing is taking place in a small room on the third floor of the Capitol,
tucked across the hallway from the viewing galleries of the House.

Cramped and crowded, tensions could run high as the day goes on.

And it comes as a new Washington Post/ABC News poll finds Americans deadlocked
on whether Trump should become the third president in U.S. history to be
impeached: 49 per cent say he should be impeached and removed from office, while
46 per cent say he should not.

House Judiciary Committee Chair Jerry Nadler won't be there.

He's had a family emergency so Raskin took take the lead in presenting the
impeachment articles, DailyMail.com confirmed.

Nadler is expected back in the House on Wednesday, which is the day the full
chamber is expected to vote on the articles of impeachment.

It will take a simple majority to impeach Trump. Each article - abuse of power
and obstruction of Congress - will get a separate vote on the House floor.

Lawmakers are expected to hash out a number of things during Tuesday's hearing -
including the kind of language that is used on the floor, according to Roll
Call.

It's usually a no-no for members of Congress to disparage the president of the
United States on the House floor, but since impeachment revolves around the
president's misconduct, greater allowances will likely be made.

After the Rules Committee establishes the rules governing the floor process for
the impeachment articles, they move to the full House.

The House on Wednesday is expected to take a series of votes - first a
procedural vote to begin debate on the impeachment articles, followed by said
debate - expected to be long and loud - and finally the final vote on the
articles of impeachment.




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