Discussion:
Have you ever noticed that the Hallmark romance movies are alike?
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Chris Tsao
2019-03-04 01:53:43 UTC
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From years of watching Hallmark love story movies, I have noticed that there are a number of common themes.



The black best friend or a black boss since the main character and the love interest are rarely black.

They are cooks or pastry cooks. It could involve a cooking contest or they want to open a restaurant in these scenarios.

They are stranded somewhere.

The female lead is in love with a prince.

There is a festival.

They share a house together.

They want to trick their parents into thinking that they have a significant other.

The woman or man has an unkind significant other.

A family business is in jeopardy.

There is a contest.

The female lead or her love interest is new in town and just supposed to be there temporarily or s/he used to live in the town they're in.
Chris Tsao
2019-03-04 02:02:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Tsao
From years of watching Hallmark love story movies, I have noticed that there are a number of common themes.
The black best friend or a black boss since the main character and the love interest are rarely black.
They are cooks or pastry cooks. It could involve a cooking contest or they want to open a restaurant in these scenarios.
They are stranded somewhere.
The female lead is in love with a prince.
There is a festival.
They share a house together.
They want to trick their parents into thinking that they have a significant other.
The woman or man has an unkind significant other.
A family business is in jeopardy.
There is a contest.
The female lead or her love interest is new in town and just supposed to be there temporarily or s/he used to live in the town they're in.
Or something else can be in jeapordy (sp.??????) like a forest or a theatre.
Chris Tsao
2019-05-04 02:45:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by Chris Tsao
From years of watching Hallmark love story movies, I have noticed that there are a number of common themes.
The black best friend or a black boss since the main character and the love interest are rarely black.
They are cooks or pastry cooks. It could involve a cooking contest or they want to open a restaurant in these scenarios.
They are stranded somewhere.
The female lead is in love with a prince.
There is a festival.
They share a house together.
They want to trick their parents into thinking that they have a significant other.
The woman or man has an unkind significant other.
A family business is in jeopardy.
There is a contest.
The female lead or her love interest is new in town and just supposed to be there temporarily or s/he used to live in the town they're in.
Or something else can be in jeapordy (sp.??????) like a forest or a theatre.
Another common plot is that a woman inherits property like a house or farm and I saw two where a woman rents a house and doesn't know that a man also rented that same house and one where a man is living in a house next to one that a woman had just rented.
Miloch
2019-05-04 03:14:39 UTC
Permalink
In article <f2d95b3c-afd7-4697-aa76-***@googlegroups.com>, Chris Tsao
says...
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by Chris Tsao
Post by Chris Tsao
From years of watching Hallmark love story movies, I have noticed that there
are a number of common themes.
Post by Chris Tsao
The black best friend or a black boss since the main character and the love
interest are rarely black.
Post by Chris Tsao
They are cooks or pastry cooks. It could involve a cooking contest or they
want to open a restaurant in these scenarios.
Post by Chris Tsao
They are stranded somewhere.
The female lead is in love with a prince.
There is a festival.
They share a house together.
They want to trick their parents into thinking that they have a significant
other.
Post by Chris Tsao
The woman or man has an unkind significant other.
A family business is in jeopardy.
There is a contest.
The female lead or her love interest is new in town and just supposed to be
there temporarily or s/he used to live in the town they're in.
Or something else can be in jeapordy (sp.??????) like a forest or a theatre.
Another common plot is that a woman inherits property like a house or farm and I
saw two where a woman rents a house and doesn't know that a man also rented that
same house and one where a man is living in a house next to one that a woman had
just rented.
The Seven Basic Plots

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Seven_Basic_Plots

The plots

Overcoming the Monster

Definition: The protagonist sets out to defeat an antagonistic force (often
evil) which threatens the protagonist and/or protagonist's homeland.

Examples: Perseus, Theseus, Beowulf, Dracula, The War of the Worlds, Nicholas
Nickleby, The Guns of Navarone, Seven Samurai (and its Western remake The
Magnificent Seven), James Bond, Star Wars.

Rags to Riches

Definition: The poor protagonist acquires power, wealth, and/or a mate, loses it
all and gains it back, growing as a person as a result.

Examples: Cinderella, Aladdin, Jane Eyre, A Little Princess, Great Expectations,
David Copperfield, The Prince and the Pauper, Brewster's Millions.

The Quest

Definition: The protagonist and companions set out to acquire an important
object or to get to a location. They face temptations and other obstacles along
the way.

Examples: The Odyssey, The Pilgrim’s Progress, The Lord Of The Rings, King
Solomon's Mines, Six of Crows, Watership Down, Lightning Thief, Apocalypse Now.

Voyage and Return

Definition: The protagonist goes to a strange land and, after overcoming the
threats it poses to them, they return with experience.

Examples: Ramayana, Alice in Wonderland, Goldilocks and the Three Bears,
Orpheus, The Time Machine, Peter Rabbit, The Hobbit, The SpongeBob SquarePants
Movie. Mad Max: Fury Road, Brideshead Revisited, The Rime of the Ancient
Mariner, Gone with the Wind, The Third Man.

Comedy

Definition: Light and humorous character with a happy or cheerful ending; a
dramatic work in which the central motif is the triumph over adverse
circumstance, resulting in a successful or happy conclusion.[3] Booker makes
sure to stress that comedy is more than humor. It refers to a pattern where the
conflict becomes more and more confusing, but is at last made plain in a single
clarifying event. The majority of romance films fall into this category.

Examples: A Midsummer Night's Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night,
Bridget Jones's Diary, Music and Lyrics, Sliding Doors, Four Weddings and a
Funeral.

Tragedy

Definition: The protagonist's character flaw or great mistake which is their
undoing. Their unfortunate end evokes pity at their folly and the fall of a
fundamentally good character.

Examples: Macbeth, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Carmen, Bonnie and Clyde, Jules
et Jim, Anna Karenina, Madame Bovary, John Dillinger, Romeo and Juliet, Julius
Caesar.

Rebirth

Definition: An event forces the main character to change their ways and often
become a better person.

Examples: "The Frog Prince", "Beauty and the Beast", The Snow Queen, A Christmas
Carol, The Secret Garden, Peer Gynt, Groundhog Day.

The Rule of Three

"Again and again, things appear in threes . . ." There is rising tension and the
third event becomes "the final trigger for something important to happen". We
are accustomed to this pattern from childhood stories such as Goldilocks and the
Three Bears, Cinderella, and Little Red Riding Hood. In adult stories, three can
convey the gradual working out of a process that leads to transformation. This
transformation can be downwards as well as upwards. Booker asserts that the Rule
of Three is expressed in four ways:
1.The simple, or cumulative three, for example, Cinderella's three visits to the
ball.
2.The ascending three, where each event is of more significance than the
preceding, for example, the hero must win first bronze, then silver, then gold
objects.
3.The contrasting three, where only the third has positive value, for example,
The Three Little Pigs, two of whose houses are blown down by the Big Bad Wolf.
4.The final or dialectical form of three, where, as with Goldilocks and her
bowls of porridge, the first is wrong in one way, the second in an opposite way,
and the third is "just right".



*
Miloch
2019-03-04 02:48:53 UTC
Permalink
In article <641f5c4b-189b-4077-8460-***@googlegroups.com>, Chris Tsao
says...
Post by Chris Tsao
From years of watching Hallmark love story movies, I have noticed that there are
a number of common themes.
The black best friend or a black boss since the main character and the love
interest are rarely black.
They are cooks or pastry cooks. It could involve a cooking contest or they want
to open a restaurant in these scenarios.
They are stranded somewhere.
The female lead is in love with a prince.
There is a festival.
They share a house together.
They want to trick their parents into thinking that they have a significant other.
The woman or man has an unkind significant other.
A family business is in jeopardy.
There is a contest.
The female lead or her love interest is new in town and just supposed to be
there temporarily or s/he used to live in the town they're in.
The Seven Basic Plots

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Seven_Basic_Plots

The plots

Overcoming the Monster

Definition: The protagonist sets out to defeat an antagonistic force (often
evil) which threatens the protagonist and/or protagonist's homeland.

Examples: Perseus, Theseus, Beowulf, Dracula, The War of the Worlds, Nicholas
Nickleby, The Guns of Navarone, Seven Samurai (and its Western remake The
Magnificent Seven), James Bond, Star Wars.

Rags to Riches

Definition: The poor protagonist acquires power, wealth, and/or a mate, loses it
all and gains it back, growing as a person as a result.

Examples: Cinderella, Aladdin, Jane Eyre, A Little Princess, Great Expectations,
David Copperfield, The Prince and the Pauper, Brewster's Millions, The Emperor's
New Groove.

The Quest

Definition: The protagonist and companions set out to acquire an important
object or to get to a location. They face temptations and other obstacles along
the way.

Examples: The Odyssey, The Pilgrim’s Progress, The Lord Of The Rings, King
Solomon's Mines, Six of Crows,Watership Down, Lightning Thief, Apocalypse Now.

Voyage and Return

Definition: The protagonist goes to a strange land and, after overcoming the
threats it poses to them, they return with experience.

Examples: Ramayana, Alice in Wonderland, Goldilocks and the Three Bears,
Orpheus, The Time Machine, Peter Rabbit, The Hobbit, The SpongeBob SquarePants
Movie. Mad Max: Fury Road, Brideshead Revisited, The Rime of the Ancient
Mariner, Gone with the Wind, The Third Man.

Comedy

Definition: Light and humorous character with a happy or cheerful ending; a
dramatic work in which the central motif is the triumph over adverse
circumstance, resulting in a successful or happy conclusion.[3] Booker makes
sure to stress that comedy is more than humor. It refers to a pattern where the
conflict becomes more and more confusing, but is at last made plain in a single
clarifying event. The majority of romance films fall into this category.

Examples: A Midsummer Night's Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night,
Bridget Jones's Diary, Music and Lyrics, Sliding Doors, Four Weddings and a
Funeral.

Tragedy

Definition: The protagonist's character flaw or great mistake which is their
undoing. Their unfortunate end evokes pity at their folly and the fall of a
fundamentally good character.

Examples: Macbeth, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Carmen, Bonnie and Clyde, Jules
et Jim, Anna Karenina, Madame Bovary, John Dillinger, Romeo and Juliet, Julius
Caesar.

Rebirth

Definition: An event forces the main character to change their ways and often
become a better person.

Examples: "The Frog Prince", "Beauty and the Beast", The Snow Queen, A Christmas
Carol, The Secret Garden, Peer Gynt.







*
Chris Tsao
2019-03-04 03:02:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Miloch
says...
Post by Chris Tsao
From years of watching Hallmark love story movies, I have noticed that there are
a number of common themes.
The black best friend or a black boss since the main character and the love
interest are rarely black.
They are cooks or pastry cooks. It could involve a cooking contest or they want
to open a restaurant in these scenarios.
They are stranded somewhere.
The female lead is in love with a prince.
There is a festival.
They share a house together.
They want to trick their parents into thinking that they have a significant other.
The woman or man has an unkind significant other.
A family business is in jeopardy.
There is a contest.
The female lead or her love interest is new in town and just supposed to be
there temporarily or s/he used to live in the town they're in.
The Seven Basic Plots
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Seven_Basic_Plots
The plots
Overcoming the Monster
Definition: The protagonist sets out to defeat an antagonistic force (often
evil) which threatens the protagonist and/or protagonist's homeland.
Examples: Perseus, Theseus, Beowulf, Dracula, The War of the Worlds, Nicholas
Nickleby, The Guns of Navarone, Seven Samurai (and its Western remake The
Magnificent Seven), James Bond, Star Wars.
Rags to Riches
Definition: The poor protagonist acquires power, wealth, and/or a mate, loses it
all and gains it back, growing as a person as a result.
Examples: Cinderella, Aladdin, Jane Eyre, A Little Princess, Great Expectations,
David Copperfield, The Prince and the Pauper, Brewster's Millions, The Emperor's
New Groove.
The Quest
Definition: The protagonist and companions set out to acquire an important
object or to get to a location. They face temptations and other obstacles along
the way.
Examples: The Odyssey, The Pilgrim’s Progress, The Lord Of The Rings, King
Solomon's Mines, Six of Crows,Watership Down, Lightning Thief, Apocalypse Now.
Voyage and Return
Definition: The protagonist goes to a strange land and, after overcoming the
threats it poses to them, they return with experience.
Examples: Ramayana, Alice in Wonderland, Goldilocks and the Three Bears,
Orpheus, The Time Machine, Peter Rabbit, The Hobbit, The SpongeBob SquarePants
Movie. Mad Max: Fury Road, Brideshead Revisited, The Rime of the Ancient
Mariner, Gone with the Wind, The Third Man.
Comedy
Definition: Light and humorous character with a happy or cheerful ending; a
dramatic work in which the central motif is the triumph over adverse
circumstance, resulting in a successful or happy conclusion.[3] Booker makes
sure to stress that comedy is more than humor. It refers to a pattern where the
conflict becomes more and more confusing, but is at last made plain in a single
clarifying event. The majority of romance films fall into this category.
Examples: A Midsummer Night's Dream, Much Ado About Nothing, Twelfth Night,
Bridget Jones's Diary, Music and Lyrics, Sliding Doors, Four Weddings and a
Funeral.
Tragedy
Definition: The protagonist's character flaw or great mistake which is their
undoing. Their unfortunate end evokes pity at their folly and the fall of a
fundamentally good character.
Examples: Macbeth, The Picture of Dorian Gray, Carmen, Bonnie and Clyde, Jules
et Jim, Anna Karenina, Madame Bovary, John Dillinger, Romeo and Juliet, Julius
Caesar.
Rebirth
Definition: An event forces the main character to change their ways and often
become a better person.
Examples: "The Frog Prince", "Beauty and the Beast", The Snow Queen, A Christmas
Carol, The Secret Garden, Peer Gynt.
*
It was not easy to figure out that the antagonist in Greenbook was racism. It was just two people travelling around.
Chris Tsao
2019-03-04 02:59:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Tsao
From years of watching Hallmark love story movies, I have noticed that there are a number of common themes.
The black best friend or a black boss since the main character and the love interest are rarely black.
They are cooks or pastry cooks. It could involve a cooking contest or they want to open a restaurant in these scenarios.
They are stranded somewhere.
The female lead is in love with a prince.
There is a festival.
They share a house together.
They want to trick their parents into thinking that they have a significant other.
The woman or man has an unkind significant other.
A family business is in jeopardy.
There is a contest.
The female lead or her love interest is new in town and just supposed to be there temporarily or s/he used to live in the town they're in.
I saw Greenbook yesterday. My wife said that the antagonist was racism.
Chris Tsao
2019-10-02 03:08:52 UTC
Permalink
Another really common theme is that the couple who get together at the end used to be sweethearts years earlier.
Miloch
2019-10-02 05:34:55 UTC
Permalink
In article <98a3c4e9-9e0a-42b7-b26f-***@googlegroups.com>, Chris Tsao
says...
Post by Chris Tsao
Another really common theme is that the couple who get together at the end used
to be sweethearts years earlier.
...that's one of the reasons I never watch Hallmark romance movies...not enough
violence.




*
Chris Tsao
2019-11-02 13:18:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Chris Tsao
Another really common theme is that the couple who get together at the end used to be sweethearts years earlier.
And another really common theme is that there is the black boss.

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