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It's woketopia! Don Jr. leads charge against 'soft' Super Bowl ads...
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Miloch
2021-02-08 16:43:09 UTC
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...- as Springsteen calls for 'unity' on behalf of Jeep and Lenny Kravitz claims
we 'are all billionaires' for Stella Artois

https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9236595/Its-woketopia-Don-Jr-leads-charge-outrage-against-years-soft-Super-Bowl-ads.html

*'One comercial [sic] in and it’s already woketopia,' Don Jr. tweeted, along
with an eye roll emoji and the hashtag for the game

*It's unclear which of the ads Don Jr. was referencing, but Sunday's event
featured a host of celebrity-filled ads, centered on themes of national unity

*Hundreds of other disgruntled viewers appeared to agree with Don Jr., blasting
what they perceived to be highly politicized or 'too woke ads'

*Others suggested political messages have no place in sport

*A poll released by Morning Consult on Sunday found that the majority of
Americans don't like to see political statements made by brands

Donald Trump Jr. voiced his displeasure at the liberal nature of this year's
Super Bowl ads, complaining after just one commercial they were a 'woketopia'.

'One comercial [sic] in and it’s already woketopia,' he tweeted, along with an
eye roll emoji and the hashtag for the game.

It's unclear which of the dozens of ads Don Jr. was referencing, but Sunday's
event featured a host of celebrity-filled commercials centered on themes of
national unity, social consciousness and the coronavirus pandemic.

Hundreds of other disgruntled viewers appeared to agree with Don Jr., blasting
what they perceived to be highly politicized or 'tame and too woke ads' that
they said should have no place in sport.

'I would love to watch a sporting event without politics or wokeness being
involved! Sports used to be an outlet to get away from this! Now, not so much,'
tweeted Robert Woods.

Another user appeared to agree with Woods, writing: 'Amazing how in the age of
extreme political correctness and virtue signaling, the SuperBowl ads are the
worst I’ve ever seen.'

'I Remember a time America unified and laughed their a**es at the Bud Bowl
Commercials while the Broncos or Bills were getting wood shedded,' wrote a
third. 'You know back before The Woke mafia took over and injected faux racism.
Bring me back to the 80’s-90’s and let me permanently live there.'

Some social media users claimed to have refrained from watching the Super Bowl
altogether, believing the event would be rife with 'political pandering'.

'I take it from the tweets on my timeline that #SuperBowl halftime had the
predictable political pandering we all expected. Glad i didn't even bother,'
wrote Juno Maxwell.

'Super Bowl ads were the best in the 1998-2008 period. Now it's too tame and a
little too woke. It is what it is,' user Just Frank added.

Other users were quick to offer Don Jr. advice that perhaps he should switch off
his TV is he was too 'triggered' by the ads.

One tweet asked what he would like cancelled now, mocking the complaints about
'cancel culture' by many on the right of the political spectrum.

As is typical, Sunday's event featured some of the biggest names in show
business, with Will Ferrell, Drake and Matthew McConaughey all making cameo
appearances in various advertisements.

Rock legend Bruce Springsteen, who has famously shunned advertising over the
course of his decades-long career, made his ad debut in a call for unity for
Jeep.

The ad shows scenes of middle America, including a small chapel in Lebanon,
Kansas, near the geographic center of the country.

Springsteen visits the chapel and lights a candle.

'It's no secret the middle has been a hard place to get to lately, between red
and blue, servant and citizen, freedom and fear,' Springsteen intones, adding
'we need the middle.'

'Fear has never been the best of who we are,' the Boss continues. 'We just have
to remember the very soil we stand on is common ground. So we can get there. We
can make it to the mountaintop, through the desert . . . and we will cross this
divide.'

The ad then ends with a dedication: 'To the ReUnited States of America.'

The commercial has widely praised, with Forbes calling it a 'groundbreaking
achievement', however not all viewers appeared impressed.

'When you think a #SuperBowl commercial is a political ad about unity but it’s
really about exploiting tension to sell an expensive car...during a pandemic,'
wrote one Twitter user.

'#Jeep be like: we see you, we hear you, now spend your 1,600 stimulus on this
car. #unity'

'Is that Springsteen commercial a joke? Selling my Jeep. The hypocrisy is real,'
wrote Aimee Remeika of Springsteen, a Democratic donor and critic of former
President Donald Trump who played at Biden's inauguration.

Similarly to Jeep, other companies took the opportunity to attempt to inspire
viewers or tackle serious issues.

As always, some missed the mark, including Stella Artois ad featuring Lenny
Kravitz, in which the Fly Away singer declared, amid widespread economic
hardship, that 'we are all billionaires' because the average human heart beats
2.5 billion times in a lifetime.

In the ad, Kravitz urged people not to 'waste the fortune within us' and instead
'invest in each other.'

Twitter user Julia Claire said she was 'furious about all the pseudo-uplifting
Super Bowl ads trying to force us to feel hopeful when we’re approaching our
12th consecutive month of March,' - a reference to the on-going pandemic.

Others decried the politicized nature of some of the other adverts, with one
writing: 'Why? Why does there have to be a political ad during the Super Bowl?',
accompanied by a meme that reads 'Damn you! God damn you all to hell!'

A poll released by Morning Consult on Sunday found that the majority of
Americans don't like to see political statements made by brands.

Among those surveyed, only 13 percent called it 'very appropriate' for brands to
make such statements, while 23 percent called it 'somewhat appropriate'. The
largest number, 28 percent, meanwhile, selected 'not appropriate at all.'

Also in the survey, respondents were asked about how much they enjoy watching
Super Bowl ads in particular that make a political statement.

A small 7 percent of respondents said they enjoy those ads 'a lot', and only 15
percent said they enjoy them 'somewhat.' A larger 21 percent said they do not
enjoy them 'much,' but a whopping 41 percent said they do not enjoy them 'at
all.'

At this year's Super Bowl, companies paid at least $5.5million for 30 second
advertisements during game.

Michael B. Jordan, Drake, Mila Kunis, Paul Rudd, and Sesame Street's Big Bird
were also among the big star names appearing in the ads.

A Super Bowl ad from Cure Auto Insurance drew outrage after appearing to poke
fun at harassment in the workplace.

The commercial, which aired right before halftime - peak viewership time, was
quickly branded the 'ad fail of the decade' and 'worst Super Bowl advertisement'
on social media.

Some even said it should never have made it to air, tweeting that someone
'should have vetoed' the clip.

The setting of the ad is an office, where a woman seated behind her desk is
approached by a male and female employee.

'Ms. Davis, Tommy just brought me into his office and whipped out his opinion,'
said the female employee.

'I didn’t just whip it out,' Tommy said. 'She was into it. Plus, I have a pretty
big opinion.'

'Oh please, it’s not that big,' the female employee retorted, with the double
entendre emphasized throughout.

'She only gave me a second,' Tommy said.

'Tommy, not everyone in this office wants your opinion,' the supervisor
responded.

'Okay, well, how about you last week at happy hour when you begged me for my
opinion?,' asked Tommy.

'I had a pitcher of margaritas. I would’ve taken Doug’s opinion,' the supervisor
said.

Unsurprisingly, the commercial - which appeared to be making light of workplace
harassment - did not earn favorable reviews on Twitter.

Ian Schafer wrote it 'should never have been approved' to air.


Some made specific mention of the fact that the commercial appeared to make fun
of workplace harassment.

'Mocking sexual harassment in the work place is not a good look,' tweeted Jenn
Sullivan. 'Just my opinion...not impressed Cure Auto Insurance.'

Another user claimed it was 'the worst commercial during the times we're in' and
one said it was the 'ad fail of the decade.'

James Dwyer had arguably the most biting response, saying it 'was actually
written by Louis CK,' who was famously accused of sexual misconduct and
harassing women.

According to Fast Company, a 30-second ad in this year's Super Bowl cost around
$5.5 million.

This is not the first time the company has faced controversy with their Super
Bowl ads, which seem to search for a shock factor each year.

In 2015, Cure Auto Insurance aired a couple of ads that poked fun at the
Deflategate scandal that was rocking the NFL at the time.

The ads featured a talking, bouncing blue ball and featured the hashtags
#DontTouchYourBalls and #LeaveYourBallsAlone.

Jeep's ad starred iconic singer Bruce Springsteen in his first ever ad promoting
the idea of unity.

The ad shows scenes of middle America, including a small chapel in Lebanon,
Kansas, near the geographic center of the country.

Springsteen visits the chapel and lights a candle.

'It's no secret the middle has been a hard place to get to lately, between red
and blue, servant and citizen, freedom and fear,' Springsteen intones, adding
'we need the middle.'

Springsteen scored the ad and contributed to adapting the script, which is from
Michigan ad agency Doner.

The ad echoed, without explicitly mentioning, President Joe Biden's calls to
summon American resilience and unity to confront the nation's deep divisions.

Springsteen also performed remotely at the prime-time celebration following
Biden's inauguration last month.

In an interview with the AP, Fiat Chrysler chief marketing officer Olivier
Francois said the company had more light hearted ads in place to run during its
two minutes of air time during the game, but in January they heard that - after
years of asking whether Springsteen would be interested in doing a FCA
commercial - Springsteen was on board with the Road Ahead concept.

So they shot it in one 12-hour day last Sunday and edited it throughout the
week.

FCA is known for creating iconic Super Bowl ads such as 'Imported in Detroit' in
2011 that featured Eminem talking about the toughness of his home city and last
year's hit ad that remade 'Groundhog's Day' With Bill Murray.

But not all FCA ads have been successes.

In 2018, an ad for Ram Trucks that quoted a Martin Luther King Jr. speech on the
50th anniversary of his death was widely criticized for seemingly
commercializing the civil rights icon.

During a year when most advertisers shunned the serious for a light hearted
tone, Olivier said it was worth taking the risk on a serious ad in order to
create a 'healing' commercial that will be remembered long after the game.

'There's a divide and Bruce wants to do one thing, speak to the common ground,'
he said.

'It doesn't take a stand, left or right, blue or red, the only stand it takes is
the middle.'

Toyota's spot looks ahead to the Olympics and Paralympics, although both again
face potential postponement as the pandemic drags on.

Its ad showcases Paralympic swimmer Jessica Long's journey from orphan in
Siberia to Paralympian, ending with the line, 'We believe there is hope and
strength in all of us.'

Jessica's biological mother, who was only 16, put her up for adoption out of
fear she wouldn't be able to care for her because of her disability.

Her American parents adopted her when she was 13 months old.

Five months later, they had both of her legs amputated so she could learn to
start walking with prosthetic legs.

She had to have over 25 surgeries growing up, but her life changed for the
better when she discovered swimming.

Jessica was just 12 years old when she competed in her first Paralympics and won
three gold models.

She has since won a total of 23 medals, 13 of which are gold, and is now
training for her fifth Paralympic Games.

Freelancer website Fiverr teased that its ad would feature Four Seasons total
landscaping, the scene of an infamous Rudy Giuliani press conference during last
year's tumultuous election, raising the question whether the ad would be
political or not.

It was not. Instead, the tongue-in-cheek ad features Four Seasons Total
Landscaping owner Marie Siravo talking about how to build a successful business
with the help of Fiverr.

Siravo drives a futuristic car through an idealized version of the inside of
Four Seasons total landscaping including a sci-fi scale atrium.

The message is that Fiverr's freelancers can 'help get you where you want to
be.'

Smartphone-based stock market investment service Robinhood bought its Super Bowl
spot in December after a successful year, unaware that it was about to make
global headlines.

Robinhood users were among the small investors who shocked Wall Street last
month.

A social media frenzy among small investors briefly pushed up shares of troubled
video-game retailer GameStop by 1,600 per cent at the expense of hedge funds
that were betting it would lose value.

'We're all investors,' says the ad that features a cross-section of people from
different occupations.

One person is using the app as she gets a coffee refill in a diner.


The stock frenzy also brought customer backlash to Robinhood and scrutiny from
Congress and regulators after the company restricted some types of trades in
response to the overwhelming volume.

'We got to the end of the year, looked back and reflected on what we'd seen,'
said Robinhood Chief Marketing Officer Christina Smedley.

The company pulled the ad together in four weeks, she said.

General Motors used humor in a Super Bowl ad to promote its ambitious push to
get more Americans to buy electric vehicles.

GM has set a goal of making the vast majority of the vehicles it produces
electric by 2035, and the entire company carbon neutral five years after that.

When actor Will Ferrell finds out Norway has more electric vehicles per capita
than the U.S., he goes on a madcap journey spanning countries with singer and
actress Awkwafina and comedian Kenan Thompson to show that GM's new battery for
electric cars will soon be available for everyone.

Logitech went the celebrity route with an endorsement from hip hop artist Little
Nas X intended to underscore that its products like keyboards and mice help
artists and makers 'defy logic.'

The Old Town Road artist cut a colorful chic look in all blue, as he narrated:
'We stand in defiance. We the makers, we the groundbreakers, we the creators,
the streamers and dreamers.

'We defy expectations, perceptions and misconceptions. We defy what logic says
we should look like, sound like, be like. We defy genres, algorithms and entire
industries.

'See we defy that little voice that says 'Oh no you can't' with a roar back that
says 'Oh, yes we will.' Because to create the future, we must defy the logic of
the past. We must defy logic.'


Dolly Parton has been singing about everyday office employees working '9 to 5'
for over 40 years, but now the country icon is singing about entrepreneurs
working '5 to 9' to pursue their dreams after hours.

The Grammy-winning legend's 1980s hit has been flipped by Squarespace - a
company that helps users build and host their own websites - for a Super Bowl
commercial.

Oscar winner Damien Chazelle of La La Land fame directed the spot.

Parton is using Squarespace to create a website for her new perfume,
DollyFragrance.com.

The singer, who is also an actor, producer, humanitarian and more, said she can
relate to businesspeople working around the clock to fulfill their goals.


more at
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9236595/Its-woketopia-Don-Jr-leads-charge-outrage-against-years-soft-Super-Bowl-ads.html



*
super70s
2021-02-09 21:21:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Miloch
Donald Trump Jr. voiced his displeasure at the liberal nature of this year's
Super Bowl ads, complaining after just one commercial they were a 'woketopia'.
'One comercial [sic] in and it's already woketopia,' he tweeted, along with
an eye roll emoji and the hashtag for the game.
It's unclear which of the dozens of ads Don Jr. was referencing, but Sunday's
event featured a host of celebrity-filled commercials centered on themes of
national unity, social consciousness and the coronavirus pandemic.
Hundreds of other disgruntled viewers appeared to agree with Don Jr.,
blasting what they perceived to be highly politicized or 'tame and too woke
ads' that they said should have no place in sport.
'I would love to watch a sporting event without politics or wokeness being
involved! Sports used to be an outlet to get away from this! Now, not so
much,' tweeted Robert Woods.
Another user appeared to agree with Woods, writing: 'Amazing how in the age
of extreme political correctness and virtue signaling, the SuperBowl ads are the
worst I've ever seen.'
'I Remember a time America unified and laughed their a**es at the Bud Bowl
Commercials while the Broncos or Bills were getting wood shedded,' wrote a
third. 'You know back before The Woke mafia took over and injected faux
racism. Bring me back to the 80s-90's and let me permanently live there.'
Some social media users claimed to have refrained from watching the Super
Bowl altogether, believing the event would be rife with 'political pandering'.
'I take it from the tweets on my timeline that #SuperBowl halftime had the
predictable political pandering we all expected. Glad i didn't even bother,'
wrote Juno Maxwell.
'Super Bowl ads were the best in the 1998-2008 period. Now it's too tame and
a little too woke. It is what it is,' user Just Frank added.
Other users were quick to offer Don Jr. advice that perhaps he should switch
off his TV is he was too 'triggered' by the ads.
One tweet asked what he would like cancelled now, mocking the complaints
about 'cancel culture' by many on the right of the political spectrum.
A Super Bowl ad from Cure Auto Insurance drew outrage after appearing to poke
fun at harassment in the workplace.
The commercial, which aired right before halftime - peak viewership time, was
quickly branded the 'ad fail of the decade' and 'worst Super Bowl
advertisement' on social media.
Some even said it should never have made it to air, tweeting that someone
'should have vetoed' the clip.
The setting of the ad is an office, where a woman seated behind her desk is
approached by a male and female employee.
'Ms. Davis, Tommy just brought me into his office and whipped out his
opinion,' said the female employee.
'I didnt just whip it out,' Tommy said. 'She was into it. Plus, I have a
pretty big opinion.'
'Oh please, it's not that big,' the female employee retorted, with the double
entendre emphasized throughout.
'She only gave me a second,' Tommy said.
'Tommy, not everyone in this office wants your opinion,' the supervisor
responded.
'Okay, well, how about you last week at happy hour when you begged me for
my opinion?,' asked Tommy.
'I had a pitcher of margaritas. I wouldve taken Doug's opinion,' the
supervisor said.
Unsurprisingly, the commercial - which appeared to be making light of
workplace harassment - did not earn favorable reviews on Twitter.
Ian Schafer wrote it 'should never have been approved' to air.
'Mocking sexual harassment in the work place is not a good look,' tweeted
Jenn Sullivan. 'Just my opinion...not impressed Cure Auto Insurance.'
Another user claimed it was 'the worst commercial during the times we're in'
and one said it was the 'ad fail of the decade.'
James Dwyer had arguably the most biting response, saying it 'was actually
written by Louis CK,' who was famously accused of sexual misconduct and
harassing women.
more at
https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-9236595/Its-woketopia-Don-Jr-leads-
charge-outrage-against-years-soft-Super-Bowl-ads.html
Bring back the Old Milwaukee Swedish bikini team!



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